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Full text of "Coahoman"

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THE COAHOMAN VOLUME 46 

3240 FRIARS POINT ROAD 

CLARKSDALE, MISSISSIPPI 3863 1 

601-627-2571 

The executive council of the Student Government Association includes 
clockwise (driver) Cornelius C. Fair, freshman communications major: 
Akimberly Robinson, sophomore social work major: and Chauncv Pren- 
tiss, sophomore English major. Tiffany Venson. a visiting CCC alumnus 
joins the 1 998 homecoming parade. 






YOU AND I GET... 





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SHAWN PACE ATTEMPTS TO TEACH INTHE HALLWAY 
OF THE WHITESIDE HALL CORRIDOR AS THE THREE 
EARLY BIRDS AS THE STUDENTS ALLOW THE OBLIGA- 
TORY 15 MINUTES TO TARDY PROF. 



SOPHOMORE MARIE TAYLOR WANTS TO 
KNOWWHYTHE PHOTOG DIDN'T CHOOSE 
TO GET HER GOOD SIDE! DON'T WORRY, 
GIRLFRIEND, YOU LOOK MARVELOUS! 






EATING IN CLASS IS AGAINST SCHOOL POLICY, 
BUT RASH EEDA FINDS A WAY TO CONCEAL THE 
CONSUMPTION OF A PIECE OF PIG FOOT SHE 
SMUGGLED INTO CLASS. 

"YEAH, I GOTTIMETO POSE FORTHE CAMERA, 
BUT MAKE IT SNAPPY!" THANK YOU, MR. 
BROWNLEE, FOR YOUR COOPERATION AND 
GIVING A MINUTE OF YOUR TIME. A MAN 
WITH THOSE MANY KEYS ANDTOOLS MUST BE 
A VERY BUSY GUY. 








A GROUP OF STUDENTS MAKE THE LEE FLOWERS 
BUILDING THE VICTIM OF HEAVY LOITERING 
BETWEEN GLASSES. IT'S OKAY, THOUGH, BEGAUSE 
THAT IS WHERE EVERYBODY HANGS. 





'"X.ETHER WE ARE "DA BOMB" AND IT 
HOWS! WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS OF OUR 
i'ORLD AND WE KNOW IT. 



STEP ASIDE NAOMI CAMPBELL. ALL SMILES FOR 
THE CAMERA. WE ARE JUST WAITINC FOR ALL 
MODELING CONTRACTS! 








CCC S COMPLEX, UNIFIED 
WORLD, CONSISTS OF 
UNIQUE TALENTS, PERSON- 
ALITIES, ATTRIBUTES, AND 
CONTRI BUTIONS TO MAKE 
YOU AN D I — US — A STRONG 
ONE! 



OUR WORLD IS SURROUNDED BYTHE WORLD 
OF ROBUST AGRICULTURE FACILITATED BYTHE 
RICH, PRODUCTIVE, AND FERTILE DELTA THAT 
WE CALL HOME. 

MARK TWAIN CAME FOR A VISIT DURING THE 
ANNUAL TENNESSEE WILLIAMS FESTIVAL THIS 
YEAR VIA OF LOCALLY RENOWN ACTOR AND 
SON OF CCC, JERRY SALLEY. 








» A GOOD MAN HARD TO FIND^ NOT AT CCC, OBVIOUSLY, WH ERE YOU Wl LL FIND TH E MOST VI Rl LE, CH IVALROUS, 
OURTEOUS, SENSITIVE, AND CAPTIVATING, GENTLEMEN UN DER TH E SUN. TH ERE TH E GREME OF TH E GROP POSE 
EFORE THIS YEAR'S GORONATION. 




HE BOLIVAR GOUNTYGLIQUE SHOWING AND PROVING ON TH E SPADE TABLE BUT REALIZING THAT PO> NC S COC 
[ASONTOTAKE A BREAK FROM "RUNNING BOSTONS." 



* . * 






GOTCHA! 



•J 



M CCC, HOW YOU DO DAT DERE?" (NO THIS NOT 
GRAMMATICAL FAUX PAS, BUT ANOTHER WAY 
SIMPLY INQUIRE ABOUT ONE'S STEELO, WELL, 
STYLE.) WE ARE — YOU AND I — MAKE ONE FOR 
ONE; ARE ONE AS ONE; SUPPORT ONE FROM ONE 
WE ARE EVERYWHERE DOING OUR OWN THING TG 
MAKE EVERYTHING WORK HARMONIOUSLY . HOW 
DO WE DO IT, YOU MAY ASK BY MAKING SURE WE 
HAVE FUN ALONG THE WAY AND DISPLAYING 
SENSE AND SENSIBILITY WHEREVER OUR BROTH- 
ERS AND SISTERS NEED US. WE ARE ONE, IN SHORT. 









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YOU HAVE BEEN INTRODUCED . . . 






AND YOU HAVE BEEN SERVED WITH A SAMPLE OF 
WHAT ARE PLACE UNDERTHE SUN IN LIKE. PROCEED 
WITH CARE AND BE CHARMED WITH OUR CHARM, 
WHISKED AWAY BY ALL THE WHISKINC POWER OF 
OUR HIGH TOWER, COAHOMA COMMUNITY COL- 
LEGE. BECOME ONE WITH US 







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THIS (S YOUR LIFE 
UNDER THE SUN! 




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N THE SOUL FOOD HOOK-UP, Mr. Charles Reid gra- 
pusly lends his culinary talents to make a fit feast for the 
phomores during this year's picnic for the graduating class. 
r. Dorsey is responsible for taste tests. 








LIKE SAND IN THE HOUR 
CLASS THESE ARE THE 
DAYS OF OUR LIVES ! ! ! ! 





How many times have you turned the tele- 
vision on and nothing on the tube excited 
you? How many times have you swindled 
the card from your parents and they gave 
you money to fill the hooptie up and you 
couldn 't find any worthy action to get 
into ? How many times have you studied 
five days nonstop for a test that your 
instructor decided to cancel? How many 
times have you gotten all the wrong phone 
numbers from all the girls at The 
Chateau? It's sort of a crunchy feeling, 
right? Well life at CCC is all world and 
those sort of things never happen to us 



because our life at CCC is filled with 
incessantly flowing satisfying moments 
and not a cloud of disappointment ever 
creeps upon our days! Okay, well, maybe 
sometimes our days aren 't always sunny; 
maybe sometimes our lives do get a little 
distasteful we confess, but that "you and 
I are 1 "feeling makes our burdens easi- 
er to bear and that sun that shines on the 
world of CCC (even when the rain falls) 
somehow lightens our burdens, and we. 
being who we are and all, just do the dang 
thong 'cause we can! 






"1 




dence hall director Mamie Payne supervises housing reg- 
illtion and handles her business quite with stealth deft. 



Sheila Sanders is 'bout them cymbals! Work it. sirl ! 



BOYS II MEN EAT VOIR HEART OUT! CCC has it's own 
version and they can sing! They have been building a very 
broad fan base of their own before dtey blow up like the world 
trade. You sotta start somewhere, why not CCC? Thev co b\ 



die name of True Hannonx. 



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Koehler Ramsey strikes an interesting 
pose to let ya'll know that he is the man! 
Either that or he is teaching himself 
some type of tribal dance. 



HIHH 





** 



* • * 



WHY SHOW OFF THE SHIMS? 
YOU CANT STOP THE SHINING! 



Why should we be show 
offs? Why should we stop the 
shining? We can't help but 
shine. Our world is full of so 
many things that make us 
fluorescent. We come from 
different corners, we have 
seen many different sunrises. 
But the shining that we share 
cannot be hidden. We have a 



joy that cannot be sup- 
pressed and our beams 
stretch to the outer border 
of our diverse worlds. We 
have a lot to show and we 
— You and I — have a lot ft 
show off. So, as Wyclef 
Jean would tell ya: "YOU 
CANT STOPTHE SHIN- 
ING!" 




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ccc 

FIRST 

FAMILY 



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*• * 



Counselor Uganda 'Holmes and Chauncey 'Prer ! 
S5A president assist students during elass sche I 
ing at registration. 





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3ng registration lines are a tell-tale sign that school is hack in and 
mmer is over! Can you sense the disgruntlement of freshman 'K. 
awkins. 



CDeeting new people who are right a home could he the best wau 
to meet long-lasting friends. CCC serves as the backdrop for the 
beginning of numerous, long friendships over the years. 



Make 
Yourself 
at Home! 

Registration lines at Coahoma 
resemble those at every other col- 
lege in America during back to 
school time. Because everybody 
knows everybody around here or 
somebody is "some kin" to 
another somebody, it is a good 
time to catch up on the latest. 
(Somewhat takes the pressure off 
the feet to converse!) You at 
CCC. Home away from home? 
Yes, but more than that. CCC is 
home at home for many students 
who live in the counties in CCC's 
district: Coahoma, Bolivar, Tuni- 
ca, Quitman, and Tallahatichie. 
CCC is right around the corner 
for many students, who have cold 
feet about taking the plunge into 
a fast paced university life. CCC 
also gives non-traditional stu- 
dents an opportunity to obtain the 
education they would otherwise 
be denied. Aside for its friendly, 
student-oriented instructors and a 
comfortable, cozy, environment. 
CCC has a user-friendly atmo- 
sphere. It's rich, fertile soil pro- 
vides a conducive spot for stu- 
dents to plant their feet and watch 
their dreams grow. Under our sun 
the bright orb of CCC. one is 
tanned to perfection, roasted to 
righteousness, and bedazzled 
with a strong education: and a 
socially developed life. Come to 
CCC. You and I could be one. 
You and I could be under the 
same Coahoma sun ! 



^How Co £ove A 
CCC tOomart 



IDe asked a group of CCC men the best way to show a woman affection, whether she t 
sweetheart, mother, sister, niece, neighbor, co-worker, confidante, mentor, cousin, teache 
or . . well, uou c^et the picture. Of course, we received some very interesting responses. 'Ho 
to love a CCC woman? "Respect her. Cherish her. Cisten to her feelings, not just her word 
'Pamper her. 'Be honest with her. Cry to understand her needs and fears. 'Don't lie 1 
her. Tlever run when things <^et tou^h. Share you mind and soul with her. 'Don't che; 
on her. Tlever take her for granted. Compliment her. 'Be a shoulder for her to cry on. % 
strong when she weakens. 'Don't feel threatened when she's strong. 'Praise her. 'Devo 
yourself to her. Cove her. Allow yourself to be loved by her. CCC men had a lot mo> 
advice to give on how to love a woman. Simply turn the pacje and see how the expound* 
on the matter. 




Charlotte Stanton is one of the many CCC 
women who deserves to be pampered, respect- 
ed, complimented, and tender-loving-cared lor. 
She is a working cnrl who juries school, 
work, church, family, and an active social life. 
'Handle your business, Sistuh! 




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■ 






<• . * 




— ?.• 



6. WMfftSfOE HALL 






ir" iywi raiR 




IT'S ALL GOODE! 

CCC gave me a chance to stand tall at 4' 7". " 



// 



When I came to Mississippi, my intent was to 
•;tart a whole new life. I wanted to do more with 
71/ life than simply graduate from my very small 
North Carolina nigh school, and find a job in 
vy very small town. I knew that just because I 
;tood only knee high to most people, that I could 
reach new heights and stand tall. I wasn't the 
brightest student in high school and wasn't the 
vost self-disciplined person in my neighbor- 
hood. I picked up and advocated habits that 
Were detrimental to my success and my 
Progress. I came to Mississippi to finally ao 
something positive. I moved in with my sister 
nnd her family and started adjusting to my new 
We. My one desire when I made it to Clarksdale 
ivos to do somethinq positive riqht away. 

I I It I I II i 

jecause I had not really planned on a collegiate 
\areer before my drastic turnaround, I had not 



done anything in the way of preparing for col- 
lege. Then someone tofd us about Coahoma 
Community College. I took advantage of its con- 
cessions to students who weren't grand aca- 
demically and their open admission policy. 
Because of CCC, I am reaching new heights 
and I am growing everyday. I have never been 
this interested in anything academic. Because 
of my small stature, my confidence has never 
been something to write home to Momma 
about. Many times because I was so self con- 
scious about my size, I wouldn't try new things, 
I wouldn't try to do my best, and I wouldn't 
dream. Where I stood is where I would stand. 
Period. The smiles, warmth, concern affection, 
and genuine interest the staff and faculty at 
Coahoma graciously bestowed upon me helped 
me to make my transition from a complacent 




weakling, to a self-assured, confident, studious 
collegian. Who's have thought that I, Vanessa, 
the person who let things pass me by; the per- 
son who was considered real "gooae" at some 
thinqs but never really a qooa student; is now 

ill ll • I I 

doing her best and reaching new heights. Once 
upon a time I was the one sitting in the shade 
and letting things happen to me. Now I am 
standing in the spotlight of the sun and making 
things happen. Standing tall. Grandly. I know I 
am not the best and there is room for a lot of 
improvement in all areas of my life. But, 
because of my determination and my will to go 
further than where I stood and where I stand, I 
am better. With a positive attitude and my feet 
planted firmly on the strong foundation of CCC, 
I admit I am not all that, but I am "ALL 
GOODE." 




Vanessa made a turnaround to make herself a confident, 
self-assured individual. Making CCC a part of her transi- 
tion proved to be beneficial. In other words, all Goode. 



eshman Goode was recently a participant in this year's 
■ronation. Ironically, she was escorted by one of the tallest 
jys in the school, James Gillespie. The two represented The 
inflower Writing Center. 



(inset) Vanessa was a promising child even at the age of 2. 
She would not have ever guessed that she would shine in 
the spotlight in The Coahoman.p 






*J~i i t one rin^ and the whole chain will resound." - Sotho proverb 






■ ■ 







IDe are the strong 
links of one chain - 
each CCC woman is 
everij CCC woman! 







THE CIRCLE OF FAITH 






* 

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K* 
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Tiaundra Riley 



I 

Have faith in you 

Because I trust you. I trust you 

because I like you. I like you because I 

understand you. I understand you because I 

care for you. I care for you because I am a part 

of you. I am a part of you because I depend on 

you. I depend on you because I am honest with 

you. I am honest with you because I can talk to 

you. I can talk to yoii because I am for you. I 

am for you because I need you. I need you 

because I love you. I love you because I 

believe in you. I believe in you 

because I have faith in 

You. . . . 









Kwanzaa is celebrated at CCC with robust, 
flair, gaiety, food, and of course, fellowship. 
The Black Library Society, advised by English 
and oral communications instructor Wanda 
Reed and other members of the English 
Department, has sponsored the celebration 
since 1980 in an effort to strengthen the ties 
that bind all Coahomans and to heighten the 
awareness of African influences and manifes- 
tations of African culture in our world. 



Several members of the Black Literary Society at this 
year's Kwanzaa celebration dramatized "The Circle of 
Faith". 

The Kinara, which is a candleholder. contains seven can- 
ties representing the ancestral stock from which African 
American people come. It is one of the seven basic Kwan- 
zaa symbols. 



■ 




_ 




fecoad j)^ of ^Mtte CewHxontj ComkiemoMtm 



•••••••••• 



The 1997 Kwanzaa Cele- 
bration was distinctive for 
several reasons. This year 
was the first time the cele- 
bration took place in the 
campus auditorium the 
Pinnacle and the first time 
special guests performed. 
The Clarksdale Elemen- 
tary School Mass Choir 
composed of pint sized 
singers with cute, round 
faces provided entertain- 
ment and "raised the 
roof." Of course, this was a 
special treat, but the most 
extraordinary occurrence 
was the presentation of the 
second unveiling of the 
Kwanzaa stamp. Needless 
to say everyone of our 
chests were fill with pride 
as Scott Jepson and Bar- 
bara Morris, postmasters 
of Clarksdale and Friars 
Point respectively, 

unveiled the stamp right 



••••••••••* 



here on CCC soil! Members 
of the Black Literary Society, 
who also performed "The 
Circle of Faith", represented 
each principal of Kwanzaa. 
This year's Kwanzaa surely 
cemented us and solidified 
our oneness. The principles 
include Umoja (Unity); 
Kujichagulia (Self-Determi- 
nation); Ujima (Cooperative 
Work); Ujamaa (Coopera- 
tive Economics); Nia (Pur- 
pose); Kuumba (Creativity); 
and Imani (Faith). Kwanzaa 
reminds us that you and I are 
one and if we hold fast to the 
principles of this event, we 
can advocate and perpetuate 
this ideal. 



Colors of Kwanzaa 
BLACK for the faces of our people 
RED for the blood shed by our people 
GREEN for the hope of our people 
and for the motherland 



The unveiling of the kwanzaa stamp is the 
CCC Pinnacle was an event that evoked 
much joy. Witnessing this joyous event were 
those on the program panel including 
(clockwise) Wanda Reed. Black Literary 
Society Adviser; Miss CCC, Latasha Lamp- 
kin; SGA president. Chauncey Prentiss; Dr. 
Vivian Presley; Barbara Morris. Friars 
Point Postmaster; Scott Jepson. Clarksdale 
Postmaster; and Wanda Holmes, student 
counselor. 



Each principle of Kwanzaa from Umoja 
to Imani was represented by Hertinica 
Orsby. Vanessa Mitchell. Alexander 
Anderson. Kevin Moore. Corina 
Hunter. Chevon Bowman, and Byron 
Townes. 



zO: 



Nursing students served as hosts at this year's 
coronations festivities. They made sure all guests 
were well and happy. 

Band members halt the groove for a groovy photo. 
Those are really chic beret, guys. 

Psychic Friends of the CCC Spanish Club provided 
psychic services during the homecoming block 
party. Don't be a skeptic! 




SGA prez Chauncy Prentiss presents Miss Coa- 
homa Community College with long-stemmed 
roses after her coronation. 

Coahoma Agricultural High School Homecoming 
Queen Amy Laws is casually fine atop her mother's 
ride during the CCC homecoming parade. 

Jermaine Hanfor and Charles Nolan, notable CCC 
alumni, left the 'Corn to return home. That's what 
homecoming is all about. 



:®z 



J4omcoihm$ '98: 








"What a transforming 
night. Every guy became a 
prince charming and 
every young lady was 
instantly a diva. I went 
from being a round-the- 
way girl to a regal 
princess. What wonders a 
silver dress and long satin 
gloves can do I" 

— Chevon Bowman, 
Freshman 




The CCC Mascot helps to get things started 
right for the homecoming block party, Imag- 
ine if it has been the deejay. What a 
GRRRRRReat time we would have had! 




Freshmen Vera Fair, Chevon Bowman, and 
K'Shana Presley looked like the young Supremes 
on coronation night. The Motown motif for this 
year's gala was fitting for the trio for sure. 

Coach Shirley Artis was among the CCC's best 
dressed on coronation night donning a maroon 
gown! It's your world, Coach! 








They heard it through the grapevine 
and stirred up many memories as 
they brought on the Motown sound 
to entertain Her Majesty and royal 
court. They are the CCC Concert 
choir under the direction of Dr. Lindy 
McCloud. 

The royal waltz caused some prob- 
lems for many who were only used 
toThe Butterfly, but this couple, who 
represented theTunica night school 
site had there thing under control. 



One of the most spectacular floats in 
the homecoming parade was defi- 
nitely that designed and decorated 
by the LPN division. The remarkable 
concoction drew many "oohs and 
ahhs." 






I 

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as 




7/ie corps of royal ushers included six of the most handsmoe and fantastically fine guys on the 
yard. From left to right (standing) are Barry Rucker, Alvis McGlown, Charles "Sugar" Winters, 
Zachary Williams, (kneeling) Clifton Davis and Donnell Maxie. 



Supreme elegance 




it night of extreme excitement, delight, elegance, enchant- 
ment, beauty, and the Motown sound. Coahoma Com- 
munity College's annual coronation of Miss Coahoma 
Community College proved to live up to its tradition and 
legacy once again this year. 'Triends and family ofCoa- 
Homa came out in great number to witness the great event 
and be a part of history. ''The theme was befitting the his- 
ory oj the landmark, CCC, and the atmosphere, which 



was filled with the love that brought CCC to it's Tinnacle. roots and acknowledge the oneness of all who proudly call 

Llli representatives shone with special radiance as they themselves Coahomans. Marvin Cjaye puts it best when 

stepped into satin slippers and silver gowns and saluted he sings: "Ton, you I see in the mirror in the morning 

Miss CCC, Latasha JZampkin and Miss Jhmecoming instead of seeing me. " Ton, CCC, we see in our looking 

Ldhsha Hush. "C%rit no mountain high enough, ain't no glass for you and I are one and 1VE are definitely 3. 

river wide enough, ain 't no valley low enough " to keep the LOVE SIJ&R'EM'E! 
tradition of the annual coronation from taking place on a 
campus of people, who embrace CCC's tradition, relish it's 




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Castasha Jlampkin and Catisha -Busfi captivated their sub- 
shone like the sunshine with radiance and splendor. 












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Lew ' itijlitk clau uhIcm ike U teack'mq clonics, lat 
it U tke only wotd we can think of to effectively and 
appwpuately bewiU tke activities duunq komecom- 
intj week. Call tit qketto, lut Un 't everybody a little 
qkettol 



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$o\>koH\ow jtHetMcle tycfyibe wotki 
the xtffopkoHCi Mid motes tke a-owd. 
fat ClkUM, H*m. 

fyeak a hq, Queen L&tifka! fat it 
CMuk! "Una luwei, eat t/owt- wtiliekt 
kenl out! 



pikenet/et' /)c. /W$tet/ pe4ow\i he* 
yieiibevAicX butiet, ike cjeU it 
cmhM -fab ike boet! 



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'Princess Ca'Kisha Shereese Chatman is a part of th 
CCC royal court and serves as 'Jkr CDajesty's alter! 
nate. 



"'Beinc^ a member of 
this year's royal 
court was a special 
treat for me because 
this is my last year at 
CCC. I am elated that 
I am a notable figure 
in CCC's history." 






CCC's 'Princess: 
£ady Cakisha 

Cadi( Cakisha S. Chatman is the daughter of 
CDr. and CDrs. James IDard of Clarksdale and the 
sister of 'Deandre IPard. Chatman is a member 
of 'Phi Cheta 'Kappa International 'Honor Soci- 
ety, 'Phi 'Beta Cambda, and drum major of the 
CCC CRarching 'Band, and the CCC Ambassadors. 
Cakisha is a dedicated member of "Faith Baptist 
Church. Cady Chatman was escorted by sopho- 
more "Kevin CDoore. Che accounting major plans 
to continue her education and become a certified 
accountant. 'Her motto is, " IDith Cod all things 
are possible." 




* . * 




I oimi 

ted 

and It 

feels 

Gccd! 




Homecoming '97 brought several sons and daughters of 
the CCC Marching Band back home. 



Many had to travel far and others 
hada$hortdri(/e. Nonetheless, CCC 
called and they came running. 
With the return of long time band 
director Ret/. Michael Jossell whose 
direction catapulted the marching 
hand to national success once upon 
a time ago, hand alumni Was com- 
missioned to come home and show 
their support for the reinvention of 
the hand music program. ReV. Jos- 
sett said after the grand reunion: 
'Tiger Alumni, when students saw 
you guys, they began craving a 
desire to become a member of the 
band, so that one day they Will be 
able to come back and be show- 
cased the Way you Were. What joy 
to be able to come back and just for 



a moment in time, go back U 
that special time when life Wa. 
simple, and good times Wen 
numerous." Everyone Wa 
happy to see everyone andpret 
ty soon after lots of hugs am 
catching up, those who hat 
gone from CCC and become 
parts of other organization: 
other families, and other World 
soon relaxed and became on{ 
With Coahoma once more. Actu 
ally, they never really left fo 
CCC Was as much a part of then 
as the band. 

The reunion of the CCC marchin* 
band brought many smiles, joys 
hugs, and thriffs. Thank you fo 
coming home. 






* i * 





SscortecC&u Go/'/ " itar (Jify" Cnvf/ie/i (tw-s ' io/i/iowo/Vi //aid ' sTiiiki > ule/v. < lo/bAomorex fAu'tf ' c7<>/a' ./aster toas escorted '6a ■. t/itont'o (Jo/Zais. 




Sfires/unen . f/at\/ ( fias/ieei/u 'll'a/Aer a/as escorfct/ 6y 
'Wi/Ziia/i (i/a'ts/oh/ier , ( /((ui>. 




r/fex/aiie/t . Match forth \ orment toa& escorted '/>ty •^errant*, mas&eoa 







rSuJ^rem&^ttrHjUtfiofw 



S77ie OuJhreme& o/ice said in 
icA a me/odious manner t/tat 
you ca/i t Atwrt/ /ooe, " mtt '/ooe 
tfi/sst si</At" toas t/te c/icAe ' one 
artietfia/tf usee/ to cotweu A is 
jnime/itaru on t/te aeautu of t/te 
29(9 ^nontecomi/ig Gourt. 
^/a/dted Atj egua/u/ stunning, 
yfe/iomo/Hi andj/^es/tme/i maidi- 
*>-ioaiting toas t/te (Q9& t //tss 
^{onteconii/ig Jzueen .fatis/ia 
Sus/t. £/(e/ 1 court inc/uded 
ata/Hi o f//e/t, z/oni -ft/ster, 
Ras/teeda C ffh/Ae/ 1 and \ /fri// 



t So/vne/tt a/ft/ t/teir escorts Gar/ 
GartAen, t //ttonio Go/u/is, c ffd/iant 
G. ^aro, and fSertHini « /Jassejc 
res/jectioe/u . £3us/t AasAs in t/teyqty 
of Ac/' i/tdioidua/itu anc/ Ac/ 1 reoe/- 

<./ Cs 

/ion to eoertjdatj Aeautij norms/. 
Jzuite natu/rr////, sAc turned Aeads 
anc/(/a/vte/ t e(/stares// < o/?t Aer/c/Axo 
Ooa/tontans t/tat nig/tt, to/to Aad 
neoer seen Aer in a/tt/t/ti/tu more 
t/tan stoeats, s/teaAe/w, and t-s/tirts. 



fT/tis 



A< 



y jjears nomecomt/uj aueen 
&renu")/i/fes t/te mu/tz^ dimensions of 
t/ie modern mafestu. 




.. 



RAIN IN WE FORECAST! 



The rain came down on this year's 
homecoming parade, but it didn't 
keep the die-hard Tiger support- 
ers away. Alumni and current Coa- 
homans all came in spite of the 
rain. Some even brought a lunch! 
All for the love of the maroon and 
white. All for the celebration of the 
unity, indivisibility, and oneness 



shared by everyone nurtured, 
developed, and cultivated by 
the elements and culture of 
Coahoma Community Col- 
lege. Rain, sleet, snow, and 
or dead of night couldn't put 
a damper on such a festive 
and important event. 





"The rain didn't 
stop the fun. Of 
course, we 

could have tail- 
gated a little 
easier if it had 
not rained, but 
the sun always 
shines at CCC, so I still consid- 
er this one of the best days I 
have had in this campus and 
believe me, I have a lot of 
them. Rain didn't spoil our 
parade and it never will. 
-Rico Smith, 1987 CCC Gradu- 



The rain did not stop the annual home- 
coming parade held the morning of the 
Homecoming Game. Missy Elliot could 
learn a thing or two from CCC fans, 
friends, and family. 







Mr. Tiny Tiger Thaddoues Tolliver and fam- 
ily brave the inclement conditions Home- 
coming morning and represented the Tiny 
Coahomans, future leaders of CCC. 



ate 





"It was good to see so many people 
who'd graduated last year and who 
had returned home for Homecoming. 
We were kinda let down about the 
rain and all, but we got it "crunk" any- 
way. Homecoming at CCC will go on 
no matter what!" — Jacques Robin- 
son, CCC Sophomore 




A 













• • 



• • • 



• • • 



Chaos was rampant on the campus 
homecoming week and nothing was 
going my way. Before my epiphany, I 
felt that because my peers had elected 
SGA president, everything should have 
been going my way or no way. My usu- 
ally imperturbable spirit was vexed. I 
was not looking beyond my desires, 
ideas, and beliefs. To compound mat- 
ters, the coordinators of the coronation 
were tripping about our court arrange- 
ment; several people didn't like the fit 
of their dresses or the color of their 
shoes. Some agreed with the decora- 
tions while others took a neutral stance. 
Instead of being on one accord, each of 
us was only concerned about our 
respective agendas. Right before many 
folks were going to throw in the towel 
on Homecoming '97, along came 
events that remedied everything that 
was making us sick. The Street Jam, 
held in the parking lot of the Pinnacle 
was one of those remedies. As we 
stood around that rotund structure that 
has become the trademark of CCC and 
jammed to the beats of a very talented 
disc jockey, it hit me — my epiphany! 
The sight of the smiling faces of my fel- 
low Coahomans enjoying each other 
under that bright afternoon sun and cel- 
ebrating the existence of CCC made me 
realize that we are made up of a family 
strongly knitted by the maroon and 
white thread that is our allegiance to 
CCC. No matter how many problems 
we had to overcome or were to 
encounter, many of us realized that 
afternoon that all of us had to work 
together to bring success. Needless to 
say our homecoming was "DA BUM" 
and proved to be educational. That 
week we learned a lesson about unity: 
Coming together was simply the begin- 
ning, staying together was progress, 
working together brought success. That 
week we learned that U and I R 7. Real- 
ly- 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



Prentiss was a dignified member of the 
Queen's Courts for both coronations of 
Miss CCC and Miss Homecoming. 




• • 



• • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • 



SGA President Chauncy Prentiss and good buddy Merracle McBride are fluorescent sight 
at this year's homecoming Street Jam. 




• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



Before my epiphany ... I thought every- 
thing should have been going my way or 
no way ! 



• • • 



Dancing with her majesty Queen Latash 
should have undoubtedly alleviated a lot c 
stress for the president. 



t • 



• • 



Say What? 
66 

HOMECOMING 

MADE 

US ONE. 

99 





PUTTIN'ONTHERITZ! 
PULLING ALL STOPS! 



The Pinnacle becomes the 
"House of Style" 



Cindy Crawford would have 
had a field day in the Pinnacle 
on the night of the coronation of 
Miss CCC. Naomi Campbell 
would have blushed in shame 
and Iman would have been 



green with envy. Tyson would have 
gone back to the drawing board 
and modeling contracts would have 
been extended left and right. Wh\ ? 
Because on that night, not onh 
were U and I 1, but L and I were 1 
group of snazzy clad peeps! To the 
friends and family of Coahoma, 
thank you for your splendorous 
fashion statements. They alone 
bespoke of how special you knew 
that night was for us. 





Faculty member Beatta Steward, who is also 
an enthusiastic alumni member, puts on the ritz 
and some mighty sharp threads for the special 
night. Could she also be an Alcomite' 1 

President Vivian Presley shows us how to 
shake a tail feather or two on the dance floor in 
her spectacular creme garb. 

Loyal supporters and alumni of Coahoma, 
including the (clockwise )Tfie Reuben Smiths. 
Lucille Thomas-Myles. Brenda Thomas- 
Hampton, and Brent Hampton work it for the 
camera. "No photos, please!" said Mrs. Smith, 
who usually charges for her photos. 



Hi 



* • * 



REAL MEN BLEED 

MAROON AND 

WHITE ... 

By Carolyn Dorsey 



... although they come in differ- 
ent colors, shapes sizes, fla- 
vors, and styles. It took a grand 
event like the 1998 coronation 
to make the world take notice 
of their versatility. The same 
guys, who were dissed only 
hours before they donned nice- 
ly fitting tuxedos, were heavily 
"macked" from that point on. 
Their allurement and charm is 
attributed to their myriad per- 
sonalities. Although they all 
wore the same outfit and wore 



them well, they have diverse 
agendas including the mack, 
the jock, the gentlemen, the 
charmer, the player, the play- 
er hater, the clown, the cak- 
ers, the renegade, the rebel, 
the revolutionary, the nerd, 
the game runner, the no limit 
soldier, and the "quiet 
types." All are one, though. 
All are of, for about, and 
inudated with that — all 
that— which is CCC. 





Rodney Lockett (foreground) and 
Rashad Spears (background) get in 
practice for the baseball season. 

The tuxedo-clad princes of the night 
await the arrivals of their ladies before 
this year's coronation ceremony. 

When not on the court emulating the 
great basketball skills of his roommate, 
Sugar, James "J-Booty" Lewis lends 
the world his charm, flair, and game. 






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Had she been to CDotown 
before she came to CCC? Che 
temptations said " she cjot a 
smile so bright . . she could have 
been a candle." lOere they refer- 
rin^ to our Queen Catasha? tOell, 
maybe not, beincj that when this 
soncj was first released she wasn't 
even born yet. 'But Che Cemps' 
words appropriately describe the 
radiance of our luminary on the 
evening of her coronation. Che 
sophomore pre-physical therapy 
major gracefully ascended her 
throne as her subjects witnessed 
the grand event. She assured them 
in her acceptance address that she 
would lead with the honor and 
integrity CCC deserves and con- 
tinually be an ambassador for 
Coahoma. 

CDiss CCC is not onkj an object 
of beauty and duty, but she is also 
active in extracurricular activities 
and is an accomplished scholar. 
'Her majesty is a graduate of Coa- 
homa County Hi^h School 
ICCHS1, where she graduated 

'Her majesty Queen Catasha is 
crowned by 'Dr. Uivian 'Presley dur- 
ing coronation ceremony. 



head of her class and was inducted 
into the CC'HS Hall of Tame. Cur 
rently, she is the co-captain of the 
cheerleadtng squad and the secretary 
of the 'Phi Cheta 'Kappa Honor 
Society. She is also a member of the 
Tlational 'Dean's Cist. '"Recently, she 
was recognized as Who's Who 
Among American Junior College 
Students. 

She plans to continue her colle- 
giate career at Cennessee State Uni- 
versity in llashville, CTl after she 
graduates from CCC. Che nineteen 
year-old Clarksdalian is the daughter 
of Uartasser Campkin and the grand- 
daughter of Irene CD. Campkin and 
the late S.£. Campkin III. She is a 
member of IDest Callahatchie 
Church of Cod in Christ, where she 
is a feature soloist in the sanctuary 
choir. 

'Proudly we give homage to a well- 
rounded, talented, and active matri- 
arch, our matriarch Queen Catasha, 
who lives by the personal creed: 
Cive each day so that you will nei- 
ther be afraid of tomorrow nor 
ashamed of yesterday. 

Che Cemptations are ric^ht, our 
bright, luminous queen could have 
been a candle. 




Queen Catasha and mother Oanesser Campkin Queen Catasha is the granddaughter of Irene 
before ceremony. Campkin and the late S.L. Campkin III. 



* . * 








.1 



Elzy Furdge, vice-president of the SGA, led the royal line-up of Queen Catasha's court. Furdge is CDr. and CDiss Coahoma Agricultural 'Jiigh School Cawrence Furdge and Careka Chatman were th> 
a freshman education major and a Coahoma Agricultural 'J-(igh School alum. special guests of the Queen's Court. 




Coordinating dress rentals, the decoration of the 'Pinnacle, the coronation line-up, placing of participants, entertainment, and simply being on hand to attend to last minute crisis were many faculty anc! 
staff members who graciously gave of their time and talent in making this year's coronation supremely A Cove Supreme. Among those persons were from left to right 'Karen U\x>ds-'Done, U'andr 
'J-iolnies, 'Beatrice 'Reid, and Otis Stanford. Acknowledgements of thanks go out to the incomparable, incredible, intriguing Carl 'Pitts, who is so much of what he is that he did not have time for a photo. 

| 





e Sophomore class voted CDarcus CDetcalf and Cakesha Allen to represent their body of members. L Renita Shaw and Sylvester ll\ilker, Freshmen Royalty, shared the spotlight with their counterparts 
e Sophomore 'Rou.altii was the second order of the Queen's court. as the second order of the Queen's court. 




Che coronation revelers in splendid silver and Hack salute Queen Catasha as she dazzles with her royal dance. Queen Catasha was escorted bi] SoA 'Pre; Chauncy Prentiss 






••••*•••••«• 



• • • 



• m • 



•••»•••••*•••••«•••••«• 






Black Citerary Society 
Stacy '.Kill and Corina 'Hunter 



Continuing Education, Shaw Site 
Aaron 'Done and Alisha 'Birge 



Continuing Education, Charleston Site 
CDoniece 'Diltz and Eric Pinson 



Continuing Education, Cunica Site 
Cassandra '"Robinson and Cerance Crutchfield 






CICA 
'Kenish Williams and 'Draper '}-(arris 



Health Occupations and Student Ass. 
Aoudean Williams and Cinence Williams 



Creative Writers 
'Keisha CDcCill and Jermaine Quinn 



(licensed 'Practical 'TJursinc; 
Pred Jones and Catarja Pields 




Barbering 
CDarcia Crawford and Corrence Williams 




• • • 



• • 



Cosmetology 

Julius 'Banks and Cynthia 'Retinoids 



• • • 



C-amhrell Hall 
Cera Pair and James 'Bradley 




Social Science Club 
Donyell CDtjles and Erica Wilson 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • 






• A • 



• • • 



• * • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• m • 



• • • 



• m • 



• • • 



• m • 



• • • 



• m • 



• • • 




Cheerleaders 
"Felix 'Tlorment and Gameka Campkin 



Host & 'Hostess 
Charles 'Brown and 'Dawn Holmes 




Social Science 
"Fernando 'Davis and Cherry Brown 




English Club 
Chevon 'Bowman and '"Rashad Spears 




Sunflower I0ritinc| and 'Resource Center 
Uanessa Coode and James Gillespie 



Spanish Club 
Cheryl Orange and 'Rennard 'Reynolds 



CDarchin^ Band 
Adrian Tlowers and 'Delilah Uauc^hn 



CCC Ambassadors 
Jerone Ghompson and Cloretha Stevenson 




'Phi 'Beta Cambda 
Christopher Haynes and Stephanie Cook 



lOesley "Foundation 
Katorra 'Hawkins and Kelvin Cove 



Childcare 
Jerome Allen and Amelia IDriqht 



• • • 



• *••-•• »••••• »••••• «•••••»•••••»• 



••••»•••••.•••• 






yOU A1K> I: Sll'PE'R'B, SGICPEH 

<DOUS, SU<P<RECDE 



• • • 



Basketball 
Sheila IDalters and Joseph Griffin 

'Baptist Student Union 
Alexander Anderson and "Ktjra Lampkin 

• ••• „ »•••• „ •••• 




Black Citerary Society 
'Jiertencia Orsby and Christopher Barnes 

Dormitory Council 
Eky Furdge and 'K'Shara 'Presley 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



• • • 




(.Piss 'Homecoming and Escort 
Johnny 'Dotson and '.Her CDajesty Catisha Bush 



Crown Bearer 
Jasmine Lampkin 



• • • 




'• 









\*4 




tf&tkutujkt, bed l&uttHitM.) 



tfoodett, tfewtie (Co&kom&) 
HuAm, A*bnu (IdUk&uku) 



jHc^butM, ^oknny (Cc&kotti&) 
ikau, iktwtb (Cc&kom&j 
UeUtet, /fun ji. (Coakom&) 



Zutftee $k<*tob fkau pwentf />(-. Vivian /Wjfet/ 
uitk a koufewAMHM^ (jilt in celebration o[ tke new 
president 'f home adjacent to tke Coakoma campus. 



si' 



J_ 



"leaching U the one pwfeff tout that makes the 
teacher an inextricable part o$ the pupil, even a$tet> 
the teaching and teaming pMceit. $he may not 
wmeniU* the teacher V name oh etfen the teacher f 
face, but (he mil wtnentU* what he hat teamed. 
— CCdnttMcto* 




English Composition Instructor Camille Walker monitors the 
essay process of freshman La'Keeta Williams 







Anthony, Gloria 
Artis, Shirley 

Barnes, Charles 

Barret, Larry 

Butler, Charles 



Caradine, Mary 

Catchings, Clemontine 

Clark, Annie 

Collins, Angela 

Done. Angela 




Gray, Prondaryn 
Griffin, Vera 
Hale, Allean 
Hale, Ann 
Harrel. Vera 
Harris, Milroy 
Holmes, Wanda 

Horton, Ethel 
Jackson, Ahin 
Jackson, Classic 
James, Jessie 
Johnson, Zannettie 
Joiner, Annie 
Jones, Bertha 

Jones, Mary 
Jossell, Michael 
Lackey. Delores 
Laws, Diane 
Lewis, Georgia 
Lynom, Velma 
Mayo, John 

Metcalf. Catherine 
Miller, Samuel 
Miller, Yolanda 
Morrow. Shirley 
Mytes, Lester 
Nunley. Jessie 
Nielson. Barbara 

Noah, Johnny 
Owens, David 
Pitts, Carl 
Ftttmon, Shawn 
Polite, Eugene 
Presley, Leandrew 
Pryor, Joyce 

Reed, Wanda 
Reid. Beatrice 
Sanders, Leatha 
Sanders. Sheila 
Scuriark. Brendah/n 
Seals. Erma 
Shanks. Jo-Louise 

Smith, Jacquelyn 
Stamps, Dorothy 
Standford, Otis 
Stanford, Yvonne 
Steward, Bertha 
Sturdivant. Dorothy 
Towner, Valmadge 

Tyler, Katara 
Vasamsetti, Leela 
Vasamsetti. Veera 
Wade, Roosevelt 
Waldrup, Lenagene 
Walker. Camille 
Washington. James 



Washington. Zenolia 
Williams, Helen 
Young. Fane 
Zing. Xuma Zan 



** 



t * 



Tke jioute tkat 



To* yean it ktx been tke kope o[ tke friends, \am\hf, alum- 
ni, and trustees o[ CCC to build a kouse foi> tke cuwut pi-efi- 
dent o[ tke tckool Ike vision o( many ken made tkit kope a 
yealiiy as tke it malestically iitt at tke toutk of campus, com- 
pleted since ))ecembe* 1997. 0[ course, 2>*. /Wsfci/ if pwW 
to be tke (ii-st president to reside uitkm tke walif of "tke koute 
that bwams built, "at we skould be (ok key. "ft tepMtetiti mote 
tkcM lust a place of residence and a locale in wkick important 
(juetU aw to be entertained and welcomed, tut it alio vepve- 
sents tke place (wm wkence CCC kas come. It vepvetenti tke 
blood, tweat, and tean of all of tkote wko dreamed tkat it 
could be as tkey dteamed tkat CCC could alto be and was. 




The President's Home was built south of the campus 
near the baseball field. The house has been com- 
pleted since December 1997. 




Elegant and simple, the house's decor exemplifies 
Dr. Presley's unique style. The living room is a prime 
example with big screen television, fireplace, and 
African artwork. 



Open house brought the president many great 
housewarming gifts. Here the dining room table 
is laden with a collection of gifts from the faculty 
and staff. 




The CCC/AHS Police Force is a welcome 
sight on the campus. Maintaining a peace- 
ful and tranquil environment sometimes 
requires investigation; thus, county inves- 
tigator Melvin German is sometimes 
enlisted. 





Chief William Houston heads the cam- 
pus police department and is also the 
director of McLaurin Hall. 

YOU AND I R PROTECTED, POLICED 
AND SECURE 

Officer Robert Haywood makes up one- 
eighth of the campus police depart- 
ment including Houston, Norman Har- 
ris, James Dear, Rev. Charlie Sykes, 
Robert Davis, Fitzgerald Jones, and 
James Price. 







Davis, Robert 

Jones, Fitzgerald 

Price, James 

Sykes, Charlie 



ptaim mww tmn clam 



i 









■ IB 

2>e<Uij ^ew«e $kau and Linda Hetty tespectiuety of- tke acaben\U division and tke uoca- 
tiouat-teckuicat division a*e pvoud to present tke body o[ yew/ important people uko nudie 
tke sun keep skininq at Caakoma — tke students, o[ coune! 



I 



Z&Z 

* . * 




Allen, Fredrick F 

Allen, Jerome F 

Allen, Lakesha S 

Anderson, Alexander S 

Anderson, CI 




Anderon, LaCunya F 

Anderson, Marcus F 

Anderson. Muhammed F 

Andrews, Seltonia F 

Anthony, Alisha F 



Anthony, Mercedes 

Ards, Frederick S 

Armstead, Rhunda F 

Armstead, Sammie S 

Armstrong, Barabara F 




► 



Atkins. Dedrick F 

Avant, flandy F 

Baker. Adrian S 

Bank/ Julius F 

Barnes, Christopher S 





Barrett, Lance F 

Barron, Candace S 

Bass, Hester F 

Batch, Terrez S 

Bedford, Linda F 



Bell. Erika S 

Bell. Lugene F 

Benson. Ronald F 

Beverly, Nellie S 

Blanch, Katrina S 



J% 



Blanch. Katrice S 

Bland. Sir Charles F 

Bland, Vivian F 

Blocker, Byron S 

Blunt, Kimberlie F 









Boaman, Justin F 
Boaman, Chevon F 
Boone, Dewayne S 
Bradley, James F 
Bradley, Lashonda S 




Breckenridge, Lola S 
Brooks, Jimmy S 
Brown, Charles F 
Brown, Erin F 
Brown, Margret F 



Brown, Marieen F 
Brown, Melinda F 
Brown, Okemia F 
Brown, Tara F 
Brown, Vetrice S 



Brownlow, Issac S 
Bruce, Chiteeria S 
Bruce, Cornishee F 
Brunt, Ethel F 
Burks, Sabrina F 



Burnett, Melinda S 
Burts, Stella S 
Burton, Ykenna S 
Bush, Pete S 
Bush, Latisha S 



Calmese, Frunshia S 
Calmese La'Shondril S 
Campbell, Brigitte S 
Campbell, Clevan S 
Campbell, Freddie S 



Campbell, Roderick F 
Campbell, Yd an do S 
Carter. Adrian S 
Carter, Camille F 
Carter, Cedric F 



>v 






Carter, Lydia F 

Carter. Shemeeka F 

Carter, Tara S 

Caston, Mariel F 

Chapman, Brandi F 



Chatman. Lakisha S 

Clark, Dairy! F 

Clark Gloria F 

Clark, Joslin F 

Clark, Kanoshia F 



Clark, Shawanda S 


;/.. - ■ ■ 


Clark, Tamekka F 


- -^ — ~~'1<A 


Clay. Janice S 


: [ 


Coarmer, Natasha S 


' ~ _ " r 


Cohen, Krystal F 





Coleman, Nigel F 

Collins, Antonio F 

Collins. Matthew F 

Colton, Teresia S 

Conley. British F 



Conner, Jarvis F 

Courtright, Justin F 

Cook, Kesha S 

Cooke, Stephanie S 

Cooley, Anthony F 



Crawford, Marcia S 
Crockam, JeCarlos S 
Crockett, Catrina F 
Crum, Marco F 
Crump, Nathan S 




Curry, Geneen F 

Daniel, Anthony F 

Davis. Clifton F 

vis. Frednardo F 

Davis, Kenya S 







Flowers. Adrian S 

Flowers. Necole S 

Fosters, Yolanda F 

Fox, Gramilla F 

Fryer. Vanessa F 



'anessa r 



Fulton, fyshonda F 
Fultz, Lesley S 
Furdge, Elzy F 

Cant, LaMarcus F 
Gardner, Erika F 



Gardner, Iris F 

Gardner, Luetisha F 

Gary, Wesley F 

Gaston, George S 

Getter, Terry S 




Gibbs, Ricky S 

Giles, Jiue F 

Gillespie, James F 

Gillie, Charnfta S 

Gilmore, Ivory F 



Glasper, Lateefia F 

Goldman, Tamika S 

Goodlow. Clarence F 

Grant, Ronald S 

Grant. Thelma F 




Graves, Tamarski F 

Grayson, Daven F 

Green, Eliza F 

Griffin. Jo-Seph F 

Griffin, Eliza F 



'• 



Hale. Darice F 

Hardy, Jennifer F 

Haro, Chris F 

Harrell. Sylvia F 

Harris. Angela S 



'• 







Harris, Delia F 
Harris, Keanna S 
Harris, Lalceithrick F 
Harris, Lorenzo F 
Harris, Tabitha S 



Harris, Tonja F 
Hawkins, Anjanette F 
Hawkins, Gloria F 
Hawkins, Vincent S 
Hayes, Kenji S 



Haynes, Christopher S 
Haynes, Jeffery S 
Heags, Veronica F 
Henderson, Columbus F 
Henderson, Ricardo S 





Herring, Steven S 
Hervey, Shannon S 
Hill, LaShondra F 
Holly, Earnest S 
Holmes, Dawn F 



Holmes, Demetrius F 
Holmes, Estella F 
Holmes, Kelysha F 
Holmes, LaTraves F 
Horn, Bonita F 



Howard, David F 
Howard, Kelsey F 
Howell, Narsunika F 
Hunter, Corina F 
Hunter, Shuvef F 






► 




Jackson, In 
Jackson. Michael 

James, Lamar F 
Jennings, Patrick S 
Jennings, Tekella F 



Johnson, Carolyn F 

Johnson, Carolyn F 

Johnson, Eric F 

Johnson, Gwendolyn F 

Johnson, Jefferlene 



Johnson, Kendrick S 

Johnson, Lakehia S 

Johnson, Lataya S 

Johnson, Latonya S 

Johnson, Phillips F 








Johnson, Sharon F 
Johnson, Terrico F 
Jones, Crystal F 
Jones, Hubert F 
Jones, Joyce S 



Jones, Kendall F 
Jones. Latunya F 
Jones, Lemicki F 
Jones, Omeka F 
Jones. Qwana F 



Jones, Samika F 
Kemp. Kalilah F 
Kince, Carson S 
King, Loretta S 
Kirkwood, Juanita F 



Kite. JeDarrel F 

Lackey. Elvin S 

Lampkin, Rosalyn F 

Lampkin. Rameka S 

Landfair, Latarsha F 



Lester, Dyekita F 
Lewis, Antonio F 
Lewis, Mario F 
Lias, Alonco F 
Lofton, Richard S 




Latham, Desmond F 
Laws, Shallneal S 
Lee, Daryl, F 
Lee, LaCynthia F 
:mon, Shaquiana S 




, Mildred 
ove, Kevin S 
Luster, Toni S 
Lynch, Shanda S 
Maddox, Angela F 




Magsby, Felicia F 
Malone, Rotonia S 
Mallard, Charles F 
March, James F 
Marshall, Belinda S 



iatl, Katez S 
Martin, Michael S 
Martin, Richard S 
Mason, Tashela F 
Massey, Jerrari S 



Matthews, Annette F 
Mattox, Shawanda S 
Maxie, Donneil F 
Mays, Kelvin F 
McAiee, Joe S 



ride, Merracle S 
McCulloogh, Stevtei F 
McFadden. Jimmy F 
McGhee, Debra F 
McGhee, JackF 







McLaurin, Robbert F 

Melvin. Darren F 

Metcalf, Marcus S 

Metcalf, Terrilyn F 

Met 




Miller. Richard S 

Miller, Rosalind S 

Miller, Tamieka F 

Miller, Thaddeus F 

Mobley, Louis S 




Monroe, Walter S 

Moore, Derrick S 

Moore, Kevin S 

Moore. Monchel F 

Moore, Shamala S 



Morgan, Fannie F 

Morris. Lukesha F 

Moten. Charfette F 

Murphy. Percy S 

Murphy, Ronnie S 



Myles, Donyell S 
Nelson. Ricco F 
Nicholes, Rodney F 
Norwood, Carmelita S 

Oneal, Wanda F \ 



■;■; ,■:■■'; , 






Orsby, Hertencia S 

Pace, LaShanda S 

Palmer. Eric S 

Parrish. Letrina F 

Patterson. Kedall F 



Payne, Charity S 

Payne, Lee F 

Payne. Marquita F 

Penny. Tamara F 

Percy. Steward F 








Perkins, Kecia F 
Phillips, MaryS 
Pinson, Eric S 
Pittmon, Tiffany S 
Pleasant, Kedrick F 



Potts, Rufus S 
Powell, Jerome F 
Powell, LaGerman F 
Prentiss, Chauncy S 
Presley, K'Shana F 




Presley, Shabete S 
Pruitt, Latriest F 
Prnce, Richard F 
Pryor, Shelia S 
Quinn, Jermaine F 









Randle, Terrence S 
Reames, Torre S 
Reddies, Tonzanskia S 
Reed, Stacie F 
Reese, Holry F 




Rembert, Tonya F 
Reynolds, Brain F 
Reynolds, Cynthia F 
Reynolds, Rennard S 
Richardson, Chrysanthemum F 



ichmond, Larosalind F 
Robinson Jacques S 
Robinson, Shawn S 
Rogers, Bobbie F 
Ross, Shawn F 




.ndre 
Rucker Barry F 
Rub, Cynthia F 
Samuel, Ella S 
Samuel, Fannie S 



Sanders, Clarey F 
Sanders, Derrick F 
Sanders, Natalie F 

Sanders, Sheila S 
Scott, Jamel F 



Scott, Patrice F 
Scott, Teresa F 
Shaw, Keveon S 
Shaw, Renita F 
Shipp, Antonio F 



Simmons, TaishaF 

Simmons, Tina S 

Simpson. Angela F 

Sims, Derrick S 

Sims, Shawn S 




Skipper, Courtney S 

Smallwood, Stephen F 

Smiley, Billy S 

Smith, Amelia S 

Smith, Floyd F 



Smith, Kenya F 

Smith. Khristopher F 

Smith, Merrict F 

Smith. Sharon S 

Smith, Tammy S 



Smith, Tolernisa F 

Smith, Tomeka S 

Smith, Tracey F 

Smith, Tracy F 

Solti. Mike F 



Sonley, Willie F 

Sparks, Lamar F 

Spears, Rashad S 

Spraggihs. Brian F 

Stalling. Rozonia F 



si* 





Stane. Damien F 
Stapleton, Don F 
Stapleton, Juan F 
Stevenson, Cloretha S 
Stewart. Gisha S 



Stuckey, Tony S 
Sturdivant, Shondra S 
Suggs, Corey S 
Surden, Natosha S 
Sykes, Johnnie F 




Cedric F 
Taylor, Marie Ann F 
Terry, Ashanit F 
Thigpen. Joe F 
Thomas, Carl S 



Thomas, Demieus F 
Thomas, Kenya S 
Thomas. Kerry S 
Thomas. Latonya F 
Thomas Leshara F 



Thomas, Lorenzo F 
Thomas, Marcel F 
Thomas, Rockell S 
Thomas. Romekia F 
Thomas. Stacey F 



Thompson. Demetria F 
Thompson. Jerome S 
Thompson. LaSonia S 
Thompson. Wilma F 
Thornton. Iris S 



lolbert. lotemua S 
Towns. Byron S ^^ 
Townsend. Waukesah F 
Triplet. Talashonda S 
Truly. Dwayne F 






Tucker, Kenya S 

Tucker, Tovet S 

Turner, Larry F 

Vaughn, Delilah F 

Wade. Maximillian S 




Walker, Ra'Sheeda F 

Walker, Sylvester F 

Wallance. Othel F 

Walter. Sheila S 

Washington, James S 




Washington. Regina F 

Washup, Katrina F 

Webb, Lamarcus S 

Webster, Keisa F 

Wesley, Shaunta F 




White, Tyronda F 
Wilkin, Demetria S 
Williams, Andrea S 

Williams. Bobby S 
Williams, Clevia, F 




Williams, Cordelia S 

Williams. Danelle S 

Williams. Elisha S 

- Williams, Hope S 

Williams, JefferyS 



Williams, Julia F 

Williams, Kentrell S 

Williams, La'Keeta F 

Williams, Lakesha F 

Williams. Latisha F 



Williams, Roderick F 

Williams, Roxie F 

Williams. Tammy F 

Williams. Tina S 

Williams, Torrance F 







t)ou cub } foe Continuing Education 



"We reach out to the stu- 
dents — that makes a differ- 
ence," said Continuing Educa- 
tion Dean Rosetta Howard. 
Because the continuing educa- 
tion division goes out to the com- 
munity and offers persons edu- 
cational opportunities that they 
would have otherwise been 
deprived of, the relationship 
between community and Coa- 
homa is cemented and we, there- 
by, live up to our name as a com- 
munity college by serving the 
community when and where we 
can. Offering both credit and 
non-credit classes in Sumner, 
Tunica, Marks, Mound Bayou, 
Rosedale, Shaw, Charleston, and 
on the main campus, the classes 
are held in the evening to 
accommodate the working class 
adult. This affords the non-tra- 
ditional student an opportunity 



Adams, Freddie 

Akon, Ez 

Baines, Gertrude 

Birge, Alisha 

Bolen, Tammie 

Bradley, Sharon 

Broch. Ella 

Brooks, George 

Brooks, Shawanda 

Bruce, Chitteria 

Collins, Cathy 

Crockett, Legirtha 

Davis, Judy 

Davis, Kimberly 

Davis, Mary 

Davis, Stephanie 

Davis, Tamika 

Davis, Tammie 

Diltz, Moniece 

Drake. Diana 

Ferguson, Terri 

Foster. Bonita 

Garner, Bessie 

Garner, Sandra 

Givens, Annette 

Hardmon, Andrew 

Harris, Oclavia 

Harris, Pamela 

Haynes, Christopher 

Haynes. Reba 

Hollingsworth, Deloris 

Holmes, Marilyn 

Howze, Paulctte 

Hunter. Delores 

Johnson. Phyadagren 



to continue her education, while 
attending to all the other responsi- 
bilities she must take care of. Many 
of the evening students continue 
their education at four-year institu- 
tions after they have earned their 
CCC associate degrees. "When 
we reach out to them they reach for 
higher goals," Howard said. You 
and I are continuing education and 
building each other up so that we 
may rise as a unit that is an asset to 
our world beyond CCC. You and I 
are one. 



* . * 





-Or -Oc zOz^Oz -O: 



Johnson, Sherry 
King, Annie 
King, Tabitha 
Kykendall, Dupne 
Kyles, Blanche 
Lawson, Karri 
Lee, Marquetta 
Luster, Mertein 
Madkins, Valarie 
Malone. Shanstella 
McConnell, LaShawn 
McCoy. Tara 
McDamel, Shander 
McGraw, Linda 
McNeese, Audrey 
Pace, Audrey 
Peterson, Carlene 
Roach. Rosie 
Roberson, Veronica 
Sanders, Billie 
Sanders, Rosella 
Sharkey, Mary 
Smith. Katherine 
Smith, Lovie 
Stanton, Connie 
Stanton, Evereth 
Stemage. Sheritta 
Stokes, Carrie 
Survillion, Deita 
Tarrant. Kelly 
Tellis. Lillie 
Thomas. Delbra 
Thompson. Gloria 
Thompson. Katherine 
Thorns, Shelia 
Truly, Deshan 
Vick, Susie 
Walker, Justine 
Westmoreland. Gloria 
White. Felecia 
Wiggins, Valarie 
Williams. Brenda 



Williams. Cynthia 
Williams, Joseph 






WHO'S WHO AMONG AMERICAN JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENT: 



f f f f ^ 



Outstanding scholars who were selected to be hold rank as 
Who's Who Among American Junior College Students were 
cited by President Presley and recognized recently at a Black 
History program. 



Cheteria Bruce is an accounting major who enjoys reading, 
poetry, and The X Files. 

Angela Harris, who plans to attend Jackson State University 
in the fall, is a biology major. 



Tomeka Lampkin is a mathematics major, who plans to win a 
Nobel Peace Prize in that area in the future. 

Lakeisha Chatman, a native of Friars Point, Miss, now resid- 
ing in Clarksdale, is an accounting major and a member of the 
Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. 



^iL 



A 







YOU AND I ARE LISTED 




f ffff f^ 



Latisha Bush, 1997-98 Miss Homecoming, is a social work 
major and an active member of the Social Science Club. 

Cherry Brown is an honor graduate of Clarksdale High School 
and is a social work major. She is a Coahoma ambassador and 
a member of the Social Science Club. 



Keanna Harris is a social work major, who is very active in 
clubs and organizations, including the Spanish Club, the Social 
Science Club, and the basketball team. 

Chauncey Prentiss is an English major, who plans to attend 
Jackson State University in the fall. He serves as Student Gov- 
ernment Association president. 



Miss Coahoma Community College Latasha Lampkin is a pre- 
physical therapy major and a member of the Math and Science 
Club and the CCC Ambassadors. 

WHO'S WHO NOT PICTURED: Robin Davis, Kelvin Love. 

Derrick Moore. Tiffany Pittmon. Cloreatha Stevenson, and 

Danelle Williams. 



AAAA 



\*4 



* ■ * 





Librarian Assistant and Librarian, Mable Carradine and 
Yvonne Stanford (I. to r. sitting) along with other library staff 
were trained this springs to properly utilize the SOLINET, the 
largest regional library network in the United States. 
SOLINET allows libraries to achieve collectively that which 
would exceed their individual grasps. The staff of the CCC 
library maintains a user-friendly environment, while still 
advancing technologically. 






Learning Resources 
for You and 





There is a place for us to seek, to find, to dis- 
cover, to learn, and to satisfy hearty appetites 
for delectable tomes of knowledge. The Dicker- 
son-Johnson Library and Learning Resources 
Center is taking its patrons to the next dimen- 
sion in research. Boasting 20 workstations with 
nine designated for Internet use and five staff 
workstations, the resource center also is 
equipped with the latest in modern research 
technology. Along with a host of Infotrac 
Databases, including Academic ASAP. Aca- 
demic Index and Health Index. The implemen- 
tation of SIRSI Automation System facilitates cir- 
culation, cataloging, and inventory control. The 
new resources available on CD-ROM include: 
BARRON'S BOOK STUDY NOTES, COMP- 
TON'S INTERACTIVE ENCYCLOPEDIA, 
COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD, DISCOVERING 
WORLD HISTORY, ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITAN- 
NICA, INTERACTIVE PERIODIC TABLE, 
MONARCH NOTES: MULTIMEDIA GUIDE TO 
UNDERSTANDING LITERARY CLASSICS, 
TWAYNE'S MASTERWORK STUDIES ON CD- 
ROM: THE STUDENT'S COMPANION TO 
GREAT LITERATURE and LIFE IN TUDOR TIMES. 
Since December 8, 1 997, the CCC Library 



has herd membership in SOLINET, whicl 
enables the library to be linked to OCLC, th< 
world's largest library network with mor< 
than 35 million records online. This vast sys 
tern supports cataloging, interlibrary loan 
union listing, collection development, bibli 
ographic verification, and reference ser 
vices. Staff members were trained this Apri 
at the Mississippi Library Commission. 

Aside from advancing on the technologi 
cal front, the resource center has bolsterec 
it's daily patronship to 1 70 daily. The main 
tenance of friendly service and efficient staf 
is probably the reason the resource cente 
can be modern and simultaneously hold or 
to basic customer service values. Anc 
because the resource center serves even 
facet of the campus including faculty, staff 
administration, and the community, the con 
gregation of all at this one place promote: 
the oneness we share. 



Infotrac is one of the services offered at th< 
CCC library to facilitate the research of it 
patrons. 



\ \ 



* t * 





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im wm W& CLWAhl> cmAto&AWht 










Wl HMk Wi 

1)0ii and }y4^£ organized and a pari ol uhateve* clique that makes 
us tick! (Counterclockwise) 

1. ty£ MCtyL $C&WZ CLW, visits Luon tlemeutau, stu- 
dents, students they appointed themselves to U mentor to. Ike group 
provides special activities for the students and visits them on a weekly 
Usis. lattice \db and liaren t>one are the sponsors. 
1. T//£ ytyCMl fTUHbl UfrMfr is group 4 baptist stu- 
dents organized to learn and teach about Christian principles and spiri- 
tual survival during college life, patthew Anderson is the presi&eut and 
Wanda -f^olmes is sponsor 

?. 'ikeCCCftltoyiWbOty ate representatives ol CCC and pro- 
vide hosting services to guests uho visit the campus. They are changed 
with "^$IC ^"responsibilities and aw the "cream o\ the crop "ol the 
well-rounded students at CCC. 

4. fyZ %fil$ fflk fCHbCZ club hosted a Uautilicatiou cam- 
paign recently and did the* pari in helping to clean up and Uautily the 
campus. The club is made up ol students who aw "ecstatic about science 
and passionate about math, "memU* Angela ftarris said. 




Ike tckool ueMp&pet, IftZ Tt$VM&, U st&tfeb ly a 

qwup of iouwattini, communication*, pkoto^apky 

wkiztet. Ike papa* U puUiikeb twee pe*» temettev &ub U 

o(, (oh, and by CCC itubeuU. 





Voc&tioud-^ubustml CluU o[ American (V}Cfl) U au 

OHjj&kuation betiqueb to unite anb o^an'ue itubeuti in tke 

oocational-tecknicat fietbi. jtoemUw include tkoie wko aye 

euwlleb in oo-teck cUa ctebit anb Uaiuiuq couwei. 




T//£ t6fi$6%ftM ttatl **b iU kelpen au tkote wko kaue fZUHfrl Cj6\)Z\tytyu fltt6®fiVi6 / k wpoub to tke 
bwutjkt tke volume utkick you uow kolb iu you* kaubt. qriettaucet, betWet, complaiuU, aub concern o[ all ttubeuU 

aub teuue at liaitou between stubeuU aub abmiuUtutiiou. 






* . * 



%$. CoH$MMMk fpek&t tke j)ay mtlx CCC 

Uprntb fyuud 



given tke opportunity to speak to tke Congress- 
man after tke lunckeon and ask km questions 
about kis goals as a legislator. Ike event was 
one ol many sponsored by tke administration o\ 
"$ro\ect Upward tfounb, wkick are designed to 



U.$. Congressman Jennie Thompson (center) spent 
tke bay witk Upward fyuud students during annu' 
at celebration ol Vflaek -ffistoru tyoutk. Congress- 
man Xkompson was tke keynote speaker at tke tun- 
ckeon, wkick also included special guests )>ean 

^erone $kaw, Mississippi l{epresentat'u)e Leonard arouse tke participants' 'interest in culture, pol 
Henderson, and J)r. Vivian Jlresley. Tke Congress- itics, and education, 
man, wko frequently visits kis kome district, encour- 
aged tke students to "get all tke education tkat was 
available to tkem. "jie encouraged tkem to come 
back to tkeir kome counties and contribute to tkeir 
communities to make a difference. The students were 




Charles Barnes is the director of Project Upward Bound. 

Jacquelyn Smith, Project Upward Bound counselor, is flanked 
by students for North Panola and Coahoma County High. 

U.S. Congressman. Bennie Thompson visited Project Upward 
Bound during their celebration of Black History Month. The 
congressman was the keynote speaker of the Black History 
luncheon. 








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$lVCi>Wl ittfiMb "ijou cub } c*e 1: M*t 



Area students from various 
high schools including Rosa 
Fort, J.F. Kennedy, C larks - 
dale, Quitman County, Coa- 
homa County, North Panola, 
and Coahoma Agricultural 
High are privileged to many 
educational, social, and 
recreational opportunities 
offered by CCC's Upward 
Bound Program. Many of 
the participants realize these 
advantages and acknowl- 
edge the benefits of Upward 
Bound: ''Project Upward 
Bound has really had a big 
impact in my life. It has 
given me a chance to explore 
college life and it has also 
made me think about my 
future more. Since I've been 
in the project, I have been 
influenced by my tutor coun- 
selors (college students, who 
supervise the group along 
with the directors) and I am 
inspired because they show 



professionalism and knowl- 
edge at such a young age and 
they were once in the Upward 
Bound Project too. — Adrienne 
Brown. 

Charles Barnes, who is the 
director of the program, is 
excited about the continued 
interest in the program and the 
visibility and accountability 
the program has gained over 
th e years. "We a re apart of th e 
educational process of kids 
who may not have a chance to 
be exposed to most of the 
things the program offers. This 
is a blessing for this communi- 
ty," he said. Upward Bound is 
one with CCC and we are one 
with the future. Either we help 
make it brighter or suffer when 
the dark present is upon us. 
Upward Bound, apparently, 
has decided to uplift so that the 
sun of opportunity and success 
will shine for everybody. 




MAWMMG&Wffl 



z&: 



HRT students often make visits to local 
hotels and restaurants to receive firs' 
hand experience for the daily operal 
tions of their future vocation. 



VICA members "get in gear" for the 
annual vocational-technical Spring 



celebration. 








Raising the roof of opportu- 
nities in the vocational-tech- 
nical division was the imple- 
mentation of the Hotel and 
Restaurant Management 
andTechnology (HRT). While 
HRT is new to the CCC cam- 
pus, it is already a well- 
established and vital addi- 
tion. Apparently, the 
demand for professionals in 
this particular field is on the 
rise because of the booming 
tourism in the Delta and its 
surrounding areas. "Coa- 
homa Community College is 
the perfect place to receive 
the fundamentals of this 
vocation," said Linda Kelly 



vo-tech dean. Historical- 
ly, it is quite fitting that 
CCC offer these cours- 
es, for the first fran- 
chised Holiday Inn in 
the world opened in 
Clarksdale in 1954. Just 
think what would hap- 
pen if you make your 
start at our spot on this 
vast land we call the 
Mississippi Delta — CCC. 



HRT students LatonyaTaylor and 
PearlTaylor are carefully moni- 
tored and guided by HRT instruc- 
tor Barbara Nielsen. 










* . * 






[he Vocational— Technical 
)ivision of CCC helps students 
let their careers to a great 
tart. Recently, the vo-tech 
livision hosted a "GETYOUR 
lAREER IN GEAR" celebration 
commemoration of National 



Vocational Education Week. 
It focused on the myriad 
opportunities offered to stu- 
dents interested in hands- 
on vocations and placement 
after their two-year enroll- 
ment in their respective pro- 
grams. The division offers 
opportunities in nursing 
assistance, licensed practi- 
cal nursing, carpentry, child 
care development, business 
and office assistance tech- 
nology, auto repair, vehicle 
and mobile equipment, 
industrial maintenance, 
welding, cosmetology, and 
barbering. 




■alloons were released to 
ick-off the "Getting Your 
areer in Gear" celebration. 



SGA president Chauncey Pren- 
tiss and Dean Kelly Participate 
in the opening ceremony of the 
celebration. 




• & . 




Kitchen training starts with 
the basics for HRT student 
Daphne Lol lis, who is about 
to set tables. 



Wesley Gary on freezer 
detail in preparation for 
the kitchen training. 




The Joy of 
Bowling 

Dr. Fouche Has "Got Game" 






In 1963, Louise Fulton was the first 
black to win a processional bowling 
championship when she won the Pro- 
fessional Women's Bowling Associa- 
tion Princeton (NJ) Open. Thirty-two 
years later (1995) Detroit's Cheryl 
Daniels became the first black to win 
Bowling Proprietors Association of 
American (BPAA) U.S. Open title. She 
is the winningest black women profes- 
sional bowler in history with more than 
$500,000 entering 1997. Daniel also 
became the first black to win 10 nation- 
al professional titles. 
Although Dr. Hazeltine Woods- Fouche 
is not a professional bowler, she is an 
avid amateur bowler since 1978, bowl- 
ing for the joy of it. She is one of four 
black women bowlers in Clarksdale, 
MS. Local bowling league records 
show that her bowling average in 175. 
Annually, she bowls in league, state 
and national women's bowling tourna- 
ments. In Tampa, Florida the team she 
bowled with ranked in the top ten, 
nationally. Adorned in her office are 
many bowling trophies and plaques, 
attesting her bowling skills. 
She says bowling is fun and brings 
much joy to her life. "When you go 
bowling you will encounter a group of 
people who are friendly and joyful," 
she said. Bowling is so much fun and 
exciting to her. She recommends: 
"when you are low spirited or had a 
difficult day, try bowling to uplift you." 



Dr. Fouche is pictured with her twin sister who is 
also an avid bowler. 

Dr. Fouche participated in the Mississippi 
Women's Bowling Association 36th Annual 
Championship Tournament in Meridian. 









Ale got next! Ixcellinq oh tke kanbwoob, tke qubhon, oh fielbt of play 
et to U expbwb. 1)ou anb ? aw mbe* tke tun tkat $kine$ oh inbioibuaU, 
)ko lath in tke \oy of leing oh tke halll fwm tke inhaHtutal play oh a 
Monbay nitjkt to tke ckeeUeabei* hyouU oh kot /luguft cochIh^. Ale got 
icxt 'caute tke lall it almyt m out court, ftuati fcott of tfyh uoulb 
\atfe a fielb bay at CCC, ho biggity ho bouk. Ale get figgy mtk it anb we 
4'mitdy \J&& ]>A \60%\ pie kaoen 't wceioeb on £f}>1) \ yet, lut 
key'UU calling toon. 






<<Ak> AA 4A>> Ai <<A^ AA 4A^ AA <<A>> Ai <<Ak> A ^Ak> A ^Ak> A ^ 




The CCC Cheerleading Squad 
endured rainy and cold football 
games; sweaty and hot basket- 
ball games; and everything that 
goes with being the leaders in 
enthusiasm. Sometimes they 
cheered with the crowd, some- 
times they cheered alone; nev- 
ertheless and no matter what, 
they cheered! 



tney cheered! 



H44A*' 




The captains of the squad are 
Shamla Moore and Latasha 
Lampkin. Other members 
include Eva McCool, Tameka 
Lampkin, Tomeka Goldman, and 
Kyra Lampkin. 






The Coahoma Community College Lady Tigers, 
coached for the first time by former Lady Tiger 
Shirley Artis, will have most of their freshmen mem- 
bers returning next year. 

Coach James Washington'sTigers boasted Marcus 
Metcalf the second leading scorer in the region. 

Marcus Metcalf, after dazzling cross-over maneuvers 
and swift dribbling, goes up for a terrific layup. 



kA4^ AW kA4 iAW kii^ AW kAi 4AW > 




rYi lT 'rTi lTr rTi 1?r r?i lT 'A 



Tonya Norment of Forest City, AR makes it at the line 
to win the victory. 








Getting' Jiggy With It! BOO-YOW! 

'.<ikkii. (lk iii. ( . k m < , k m< il ii<. (i iWi, (1 im. <lv iH4 





Tara penetrates and strate- 
gically makes a hole to 
take it to the hoop and 
"BRANGONTHENOIZE!" 







-i— 1 






'"^ JHKSSg 








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■->■'- 9 





Tonya Rembert, future WNBA star, 
great-baller andTiger-spirited. 

Kevin' Love looks up to rebound 
andTyrone (left) looks to the cam- 
era for a photo opportunity. 



* t * 



The girls on the yard formed their own intra- 
mural squads this year. These young ladies 
come from all of those groups, collectively 
called BASKETBALL GIRLS. 



ALL STARS wreaked havoc on the court 
and were a challenge for all oncomers. Do 
that "bankhead" Jarvis! 




BULLDOGS up in hur. No that is not a mis- 
pelled word, that's how they pronounce it. 
Thur dey go! 

NO LIMIT WARRIORS hud the finest, 
freshest guys on the team. They all were too 
pretty to play hard, but they broke off what 
they could without messing up their mani- 
cures. 

* . * 



HOLLANDALE members did not forget 
about home and named themselves for the 
town where they were born and bred. Well, 
born and raised. 

TRU was committed to the "pill" and to their 
skills. Nobody ever said Sugar's nose, James 
Gillespie's feet, Lil'Joe's lip, or any of the 
other minor problems got in the way of their 
TRU game. 





AW. 




$kau mi Mt expected to ww 
ouet tke jhempkU tfulldoqt. 
Tkey pwlaUu weren't even 
expected to mn ooe* many of 
tke team* in tke iuhamutat 
tournament . Xkey wi$H, kow 
eve*, at tke iuhamuhal ckam- 



Did Pike eat a pickle? No. he is just sour 
over the unexpected loss to Shaw. Mem- 
phis had to settle for second place up in 
thur! 



plow and tkeit victory mi even 
fweete* became tkeif gained vic- 
tory /tarn tke team tkat "talked 
tke mod noUe, "(aid $kau play- 
eh. Tke tyempkii tfulldoqf wete 
kuiked up by tke team tkey 
catted "county. " fyiaq county 
ain't all tkat lab, kuk (etUfl 




Coach Taylor oversees intramural activities 
and makes sure everything runs smoothly. 
Thanks Coach Taylor. 



HAW was proclaimed the Intramural Cham- 
ons 1998. 



'• 



* . * 



Ella Morris, formerly Ella Stampley, left 
behind a stellar coaching record. We dedi- 
cate this yearbook to her because of her 
commitment to the excellence that CCC 
stands for. We honor her and give her the 
highest praise for her excellent achieve- 
ment. 



Meet the Tigerettes 



Coach Ella Morris sent most of her 300 play- 
ers on to four year colleges on basketball 
scholarships. At right is her 1978 squad. 



B. McCray 



J. Mosby 






P. Haynes 



C. Dugan, Trainer 



T. Jackson 



T. Price 






U AND I HONOR 
HER RECORD 
ITSELF 

Two decades ago Coahoma Community 
College fielded its first women's basketball 
team after a ten year absence from the 
sport. The season was 1975 and the Lady 
Tigers played a 1 game schedule going 8- 
2. Just four years later, the 1 979 team made 
it to the number two ranked team in the 
country and an appearance in the National 
Junior College Athletic Association Champi- 
onships. The teams since have built a tradi- 
tion on winning, high scoring and a running 
brand of basketball that has become the 
trademark of Lady Tiger basketball. And 



ELLA MORRIS 
SPEAKS FOI 



only one head coach has guided mo 
than 300 players over the years up ur 
1997. Coach Ella Morris after 30 yec 
retired last year and this 1 998 issue of c 
annual, The Coahomon: U 8 I R 1 is de 
icated to this woman, whose reco 
speaks for itself. She embodies the exa 
lence and leadership that is evident in tl 
victories she has garnered and the defe ! 
of purpose she has never committed. SI 
was dedicated to CCC and now we gH 
her long overdue reverence. 



the 1998 Basketball Homecoming, Coach Morris was 
>nored with the induction or her name to the CCC Ath- 
ric Hall of Fame. She is seared with athletic director 
mes Washington, who the head coach of the CCC 
six's Basketball team and Bessie Silket the head cooch 
the Coahoma Aggie Girls' Basketball teams. 




tfttefr Xtfio j)eca&e$ of "tyotk'M 




Just four years offer she took on the job as 
coach, the 1979 CCC Tigerettes made it to 
the number two ranked team in the country 
and garnered an appearance in rhe Nation- 
al Junior College Athletic Association Cham- 
pionships. She retired from rhe hardboards 
with a 430-195 mark in women's basket- 
ball. A stellar record is what she made for 
herself and, which made the friends, alum- 
ni, supporters, and her followers very proud. 
"It is with deepest regret that we say good- 
bye to Coach Morris," said Dr. Presley, "Coach 
Morris has brought national attention to Coa- 
homa and our basketball program." And 
she did indeed. 

Looking back over the years, the honors 
she has earned would make any coach 
smile. Besides the 1979 team, she has been 
to the state championships 1 times and the 
regional championships 15 rimes. She was 
named one of the Top Ten women's coach- 
es in the country; coached rhe U.S.A. 
Olympic Festival South Team; coached the 
Mississippi North All-Star team six times, win- 
ning five; and in 1988, received the Distin- 
guished Alumni Citation of the Year from rhe 
National Association for Equal Opportunity in 
Higher Education. 



"I am certainly going to miss the daily contact with stu- 
dents and players," said Coach Morris who has coached 
for 23 yeors at CCC. At right she is pictured with her 
1990-91 squod. 



As far as being ONE with the students she 
has come in contact with and who hove 
been blessed with the privilege of her tute- 
lage, she says: "I have had the good fortune 
to see a lot of my players go on to become 
successes. We gave rhem rhe opportunity 
here ro prove rhemselves, and I am just 
grareful ro have played a parr in rhe lives of 
so many srudenrs." 




Morris' 1 979 ream made it to the number two ranked 
team in the country and an appearance in rhe Nation- 
al Junior College Athletic Association. 




* • * 




••••«.••• 



• •• 



•••••«•••••.•••••..•• 



.♦•« 



fig 

VS. 

V5 



V 



^> 





Of course, someone is asking about the 
inclusion of Aggie in this year's annual as they 
always do. Well, I am grateful that I am here to 
respond. You and 1 as Coahomans are an inex- 
tricable part of Aggie. Whether you are from 
West Tally High or Quitman High, because 
you are a Coahoman, you are also one with 
Aggie. CCC was birthed by the dreamers, who 
would have never dreamed it if weren't for the 
graduates of Aggie. I am happy to introduce the 
seniors and royalty of Coahoma Agricultural 
High School, not simply because I am of and 
about Aggie, but because we, the yearbook 
staff, were dreamers who dreamt this volume 
and now, as those who dreamt CCC, we have 
finally seen what our hearts had always 
believed. I have grown up on this campus for 
four years as Aggian and I am now a man as a 
Coahoman. I am thankful for this. 

As co-editor I acknowledge those who coop- 
erated with us, who tolerated our confusion 
and frustrations and who prayed for our suc- 
cess. I thank Dr. Presley for appointing me to 
this position for I am a better man who is famil- 
iar with hard work because of it. I thank my 
family, especially my parents who put up with 
late night comings-in and no gas in the car 
hardly ever. I thank my fellow staffers, espe- 
cially my friend Reggan Mason, who helped 
me when she really didn't have to. I apologize 
to many of those who we didn't get around to 
covering (night school sites, nursing division). 
Please charge it to our heads, which were bare- 
ly screwed on most of the time. Lastly, I thank 
God lor the opportunity to work with such an 
advisor as Xuma. She was a joy and a pain, but 
all worked together for the good. She is my 
mentor and that of so many people. I hope she 
realizes how much she has helped me in my 
personal and spiritual development. To the 
memory of my fellow Aggian, Reggie Miller, 
I dedicate these pages and to all of you I 
remind that You and I are 1 and there is no 
other way to be. GOD's SPEED. 



• • • 



• • • 



Who would have known that I, Cornelius 
Fair, would be entrusted with the position of 
co-editor of the 1998 Coahoman. Stranger 
things have happened, I guess Well. 1 know. 




Cornelius Fair, co-editor and forever Aggian is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Chatman off I 
ars Point. He is a communications major at CCC and a member of the SGA. 



• • 




:<&z 









&o/h£ci (j/iatman 





s*4 



Here Reggie Miller is pictured (right) with his 
brother and was not much older than this 
photo at the time of his death. 

Mr. John Brown is the principal of Coahoma 
Agriculture High school. 





Nature's first green is 

gold, 

Her hardest hue to hold. 

Her early leaf's a flower; 

But only so an hour. 

Then leaf subsides to leaf. 

So Eden sank to grief, 

So dawn goes down to 

day. 

Nothing gold can stay. 






Our class was grief-stricken as we 
struggled to cope with the loss of 
our own. The only hardship we 
expected to encounter this year 
was maybe not raising enough 
money for senior trip or not getting 
an acceptance letter from col- 
leges. But one chilly morning we 
experienced what was collectively 
deemed as something simply 
called "bad." Our beloved class- 
mate and friend was no longer with 
us. We had to deal with the fact 
that we would never see him again 
in this life. We realized that he 
wouldn't be with us at prom time. 
He wouldn't be there as our names 
were called and our diplomas con- 
ferred. He wouldn't be there with 
us as we embarked on new tomor- 
rows and stepped over unfamiliar 
but exciting thresholds. We have 
missed him because he is no 
longer here. But we have learned 
that nothing gold can stay and his 
departure from our world has 
taught us to treat everyday as if it 
were our last and make the most 



of every moment God gives us 
Reginald Miller will always in spir 
be with us. Knowing this make 
our misery easier to endure. W 
thank God for Reginald's exis 
tence. We will see him again. Th£ 
is our hope. 

Our beloved brother was a popi 
lar guy. The ail-American flirtatious 
friendly, talkative, and stylish teer 
He was a member of the Coahom 
Agricultural High School footba 
team and was a very talented ath 
lete. He was the son of Tommi 
Croom and Elise Miller Croom an 
was born on July 21, 1979 i 
Clarksdale, MS. He was a baptize 
Christian and a member of Beaut 
ful Zion M. B. Church, where h 
served as church usher. At th 
time of his death, he was bein 
courted by a number of collegiat 
athletic programs throughout th 
state, including Coahoma Commi 
nity College. Nothing gold can sta 
we have learned, but our memc 
ries and thoughts of Reggie remai 
vividly golden. 



L 




Artis, Nicholas 
Bailey, Marcus 
Braxton, Tamara 
Brunt, Zakeena 
Byrd, Elroy 
Boxd, Robert 
Carter, Lakesha 

Chatman, Tareka 
Christian, Jacqueline 
Coley, Willie 
Cook, Lenita 
Conard, Derrick 
Evans, Alice 
Furdge, Lawrence 

George, Terrell 
Gober, SaKeem 
Hampton, Erica 
Harris, Teoke 
Holly, Norris 
Holmes. Estella 
Johnson, Mettro 

Jones, Carl 
Jones, Phaelie 
Kirkwood, Karrienna 
Lampkin, Natasha 
Laws, Amy 
Lemons, Sutoria 
Lester, Collen 

Lofton, Jaunville 
Bryon, Marshall 
McNeal, Chermon 
McNeal, Marquetta 
Moore, Cliffrod 
Perkins, Catrina 
Prater, Silvio 

Price, Jay 
Pryor, Lawanda 
Pollard. Jonathan 
Pollard, Nicholas 
Reddick, Kaletha 
Richardson III. Thomas 
Rushing. Erica 

Scott, LaTerrance 
Scott, Tiffany 
Shelton, Kristel 
Smith. Denetha 
Smith. Teresa 
Staple. Patrice 
Suggs. Andrea 

Tate. Natarsha 
Thomas. Teresa 
Turner. Eddie 
Washington. Cassandra 
Washington. Lorerzo 
Williams. Felecia 
Williams. Roshunda 









/Mien, LaUo\j& 

tfetl, ^ufemee 

fyyfOH, Tkom&f 



l)um&f, Il&tkei4ue 
<&<Ut. Hetty 



jia.\*ito*, iuteka 

■fiickf, fumef 

■fiottim, Himea)& 



limit, jH&ya 
Lackey, imauuet 

Uwi, }<immiatt 



tytfibou:, fiuinii 
fyetcalf, ICu/U. 

bed, Cki-iftopkei- 



hitti, tyiahtam 
JtolLub, lioua 
fcott, /IbufM 
iijkei, ~Uytc* 



IcUiueh, Tk&bbouf 

Wi'k), CUtMUCik'Ut 




! 




4* 




The Education Club 
shows their love as they 
visit the Tiny Tigers. 

Alexander Anderson 
meets a new friend 
while visiting the Tiny 
Tigers. 




The Clarksdale Fire 
Shief shares some tips 
with the Tiny Tigers in 
:ase of a fire. 



* t * 



Coahoma Community College stands as the 
educational oasis of the Delta and basks 
everyday in the CCC sunshine, being one 
with all. The sun always shines at Coahoma. 







Editorial: Spears 
Sparingly Speaks 




As everyone who knows me knows, I am a man of 
extremely few words. Some people think I'm shy, 
but, as I have been taught since I was a little one, 
I don't see the need to say much if I don't have 
much to say. Well, at this point, I have quite a bit to 
say; though not as much as last year's editor. (A 
page is too much to say anything, Tara Seals!) 
First, I extend gratitude to last year's editor, Tara 
Seals, who had a lot to do with me being appoint- 
ed to editor this year. I'll soon join her at State next 
year. Secondly, to the hardworking members of the 
Coahoman who actually worked (you know who 



you are) I thank you for taking responsibility to dc 
what you committed to do. To my fellow Coa- 
homans, I'll miss all of you as I take my journey tc 
another place, but I will always be one with you sc 
therefore I am not saddened though a little — 
almost forgot! I have got to thank our adviso 
Xuma, who tirelessly worked to make us want the 
best yearbook ever published. Her SUNFLOWEF 
energy was never depleted, even after everyone 
else had decided to go home. You are loved. Ms 
Zing! Oh, yeah, thanks to you too, Reggan. I'll be 
checking on you at Memphis State. 



Last year's editor Tara Seals was only about two 
years-old here. I will join her at Mississippi State 
next fall. 

You and I, Rashad Spears, will always be one 
because of our ties to CCC. 



I 




* ■ * 



THE LAST WORD 

B Y MANAGING EDITOR REGGAN NICOLE MASON 




w^ 






\* 



Reggan Nicole Mason was the managing edi- 
tor for the "U and I R 1" edition The Coa- 
homan. She plans to attend University of 
Memphis in the fall. 



Lately, I have been really into 
Nikki Giovanni. Her words 
comfort me so, as I think about 
the daunting days ahead. The 
days that I no longer have at 
CCC. I will greatly miss the flo- 
rescence of the Sunflower 
Writing Center; I will greatly 
miss all the social events in 
and around the Pinnacle. I will 
miss, sorely miss, the friends I 
have made and the laughter 
we all have shared. Even 
though creating this edition 
was so much work and stress 
and many long and tedious 
hours, I will also miss my fellow 
staffers, especially Peanut and 
Rashad and, of course, Few Jr. 
But, I know that we will not 
depart spiritually, for we all had 
humble beginnings at CCC 
and a great growing process. 




Morcedz Rush is now a member of the CCC 
Choir and a "playa" in every sense of the 
word. Must have been a beautiful baby. 

Lacunya Anderson didn't want to pull her hat 
off for this picture. Looks like she didn't want 
ot take the picture either. 






We all have matured and we 
all have made positive 
changes in our lives in order to 
reach the goals we have set for 
ourselves. I am glad to have 
planted my feet on the fertile 
soil of CCC and to have been 
nurtured by its discipline and 
love. As I conclude, I reiterate 
the fact that we have only just 
begun. We have only taken our 
first step toward the excellence 
Dr. Presley is forever talking 
about. Now, we must leave to 
continue our quest. I have 
been given the privilege to 
compose a volume of memo- 
ries, and that is what I am com- 
forted by as I essay to go from 
this place. Memories of CCC, 
the knowledge that we are 
inseparable no matter what, 
and my Nikki Giovanni poetry. 



I think I'll cope. Thank you, 
CCC, for the memories. Thank 
you for making me want to be 
a part of CCC. You and I are 
one. I leave you with words ol 
Nikki and thereby hope you are 
also comforted: (Reprintec 
from The Selected Poems ofNikk, 
Giovanni "Revolutionary 

Dreams") I used to dream, mili- 
tant dreams of taking over Amer- 
ica to show these white folks how 
it should be done. /I used to drearr 
radical dreams of blowing every- 
one away with my perceptive 
powers of correct analysis./ 1 ever 
used to think I'd be the one to stop 
the riot and negotiate the peace. 
Then I awoke and dug/ That if 
dreamed natural/Dreams of beinj 
a natural/Woman and doing wha 
a woman/Does when she is natu 
ral./I would have a revolution. 



» t * 





Where is Waldo? ... and Raz, Kanosha 
Clark, Angela Harris, Sugar, Merracle 
McBride, Max Wade, Willie Burnett, Antonio 
Collins, California, Xuma? 




* . * 



YOU AND I ARE ONE: 
We will never leave CCC! 




- *• v!**" 
•*-.... ..^.-v? 



As we leave Coahoma, we leave here as suckling babes, because this place is 
our first step into the collegiate world. We leave our familiar surroundings to 
go to places we have yet to know. I am excited and apprehensive, because CCC 
has come to be my place to be. But in order for us to grow and become what 
we are aspiring to be, we must let go of CCC's apron strings and be the men 
and women CCC has helped us to develop into. I end this volume with pho- 
tos of some of us when we were yet babies. 

This gesture is to serve as a reminder that somehow or another, we always have 
new steps to make, but the first step is the most important for the ""journey of 
a thousand miles begins with the first step." Our first step was and is CCC and 
our journey is not at its end but its beginning. As the sun shines on us and our 
beloved CCC, we realize that our bonds will never be broken. Henceforth, 
now, and forever more: YOU AND I R 1 . 

Rashad Spears 
Editor and Chief 






, 



mLi 



IAHOMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

"1998"